minimalistic Kitchen by Beriot, Bernardini arquitectos

How 3 tiny apartments maximised their space

Honor Kennedy Honor Kennedy
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With increasing housing shortages and demand for domestic space at an all-time high, it is no wonder individuals are turning to compact dwellings that maximise their floor plan in innovative and creative ways. However, just because homes may be smaller and less commodious, doesn’t mean you need to sacrifice your quality of life. In addition to the many benefits of living in a smaller space, economical rent is definitely at the top of the list. But how does one transform a small abode into a liveable, usable and practical residence? 

Today on homify we have three examples to show you exactly how you can maximise your tiny property, while maintaining privacy, style and sophistication. Let’s take a look inside these inspiring dwellings…

Apartment 1: a compact dwelling in Italy

This first apartment is compact yet stylishly adorned with the latest in design trends. Located in Bologna, the 33 square metre abode is a multifaceted and intriguing space. As this home is a studio (one-room) apartment, it was necessary for the architects to divide the living and sleeping areas. This has been done using partition walls that offer privacy, as well as handy storage for domestic appurtenances.

Dividing the different areas of the home

 Corridor, hallway by MIROarchitetti
MIROarchitetti

la libreria passante

MIROarchitetti

Studio apartments are among the most difficult to design and adorn due to the lack of space, and lack of walls. From this vantage we are able to see the newly formed corridor, which comes replete with shelving and storage racks. Conceived and undertaken by MIRO Architetti, this is one truly liveable and inspiring home.

Apartment 2: a truly tiny attic home

Next up we head to Madrid to take a peek inside an amazingly compact Spanish loft home. Named Loft Zurita, the architects Beriot Bernadini worked with the notion of a landscape to distort the perceived size of the interior.

The staircase works in many different ways in this apartment, and enjoys multi-functional status. Here it is used to delineate the kitchen from the rest of the room, as well as offering seating for those using the combined table.

The hidden bedroom

At the request of the owner, the architects were required to implement and employ a full size staircase. This ‘real’ staircase offers an easy way to ascend to the hidden bedroom, as well as providing access to the ample storage in the loft overheads.

Apartment 3: a different kind of loft apartment

Similar to the aforementioned attic dwelling, this next home takes a similar approach to maximising space in a tiny dwelling. Designed by the same architects, Beriot Bernadini, this 28 square metre former office is located in the historic centre of Madrid. 

The brief was to create a functional and usable dwelling, embracing the restrictive dimensions of the single room. The result is a highly enjoyable space, which takes advantage of the generous 3.5-metre ceiling height, and employs a range of modular multi-purpose furniture.

Hidden spaces and rooms

Within this apartment, there are plenty of hidden surprises to enjoy. In this image we see the downstairs living area, and the kitchen that has been opened up to the rest of the room. The bathroom is also hidden, while the bedroom sits about with a sleeping space of 1.5 metres. Conceived as one single piece of furniture, this design is similar to a Rubik’s cube in its ability to shift, change and alter, depending on the needs of the occupant within.

We hope you enjoyed taking a peek inside these three apartments! If you would like to take another tour, we think you’ll like: The modern city apartment you'll love

Which of these apartments would you most like to live in? 
modern Houses by Casas inHAUS

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